Home of edible weed walks in Melbourne, and the publication:
The Weed Forager's Handbook: A Guide to Edible and Medicinal Weeds in Australia

Tag: recipes (Page 1 of 3)

Pumpkin Mallow Curry

Serves 6-8

2 tablespoons coconut oil
1 large onion
4 cloves garlic
2 teaspoons of cumin
2 teaspoons of turmeric
2 teaspoons of coriander seeds
1 teaspoon garam masala
½ teaspoon of cayenne pepper
2 teaspoons of salt
1 cup red lentils
1 litre of stock (or 1 tablespoon of stock powder plus water)
About 600 grams of pumpkin
4 cups of firmly-compressed mallow leaves
an egg-sized piece of fresh ginger
2/3 cup of coconut cream.

mallow leaf

1.     Chop the onion and garlic. Melt the coconut oil in a large, heavy-based saucepan and fry the onion, garlic and spices.
2.     Chop your pumpkin into 3cm chunks. Wash the mallow leaves, then chop roughly. Add both to the pot along with the lentils, stock and salt. Cover and simmer until the mallow, pumpkin and lentils are all tender.
3.     Stir in the finely chopped ginger, plus the coconut cream, and simmer, uncovered, for a further 5 minutes. Serve with pickle, a dollop of yoghurt and naan bread, or on basmati rice.

Nettle Saag Paneer

Serves 2

2 cups of blanched nettle (approx. 1 huge bunch fresh)
2 tablespoons coconut or vegetable oil
1 teaspoon turmeric
¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper
½ teaspoon salt
pepper
200 g paneer cheese cut into 2 cm cubes
A medium onion, finely chopped
3 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 heaped tablespoon fresh ginger, peeled and finely chopped
1 large green chilli, finely chopped – serrano is the classic; remove the seeds if you want less heat
2 teaspoons ground coriander
1 teaspoon ground cumin
½ teaspoon garam masala
½ cup coconut cream

1.     Using a glove one hand and scissors in the other, chop the leaves and tips off the nettle stalks (thin young stems are fine to keep). Put the nettle in a bowl and pour in enough boiling water to cover them, give them a stir for 30 seconds, then drain (reserve a little of this ‘nettle tea’ to add back in later). Pour cold water over the nettle to refresh, then drain again. Chop finely.

2.     Pre-chop the onion, garlic, ginger and chilli.
3.     Heat the oil in a heavy-bottomed pan along with the cayenne, turmeric and salt, and fry the paneer briefly until golden on all sides. Remove the paneer from the oil.
4.     Add the onion, garlic, ginger and chilli into the hot oil in the pan. Fry gently until deep caramel-brown, stirring all the while, and adding a drizzle of your reserved nettle tea as needed when the pan becomes too dry. Add the garam masala, cumin, and coriander, and stir until the smell becomes harmonious.
5.     Add in the nettle and coconut cream and cook gently for a further 5 minutes.
6.     Add the paneer cubes back into the saag for a final warming, and serve on basmati rice or naan bread with a dollop of yoghurt (the rice shown here is made with lightly toasted mustard seeds and shredded coconut).

Dandelion, Pear and Walnut Salad

Serves 4 as a side dish

1 ripe but still firm pear or a crisp, tart red or pink apple
½ cup walnuts
4 spring onions
1 cup of gently-compressed dandelion greens

Dressing
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1½ tablespoons lemon juice
1 teaspoon of Dijon mustard
salt and pepper

  1. Lightly toast walnuts and allow to fully cool.
  2. Make the dressing.
  3. Cut the pear into centimeter-wide wedges. (If using apple, also then cut the wedges into sections about a half a centimeter wide). Put them into your salad bowl and toss in a little of the dressing to prevent browning.
  4. Finely chop the spring onion, then wash and dry the dandelion greens and chop them roughly across the grain. Add both to the salad bowl.
  5. Add the walnuts and the rest of the dressing and mix before serving.
« Older posts

Up ↑